ISSUE SIX IS HERE

UNFORGETTABLE SARDINES

BY TEZOZOMOC
     
We eat
Sol-Mex Sardines
because the cow’s
milk is desiccate.
 
We eat Sardines
packed in brazen
symmetrical oval coffins.
Sardines
stowed in blood,
blood, blood sauce,
because the fields
are bone-dry.
 
The bean vines
have dried
along the with
the corn stalks,
and our stomach’s
empty,
fallow as the
field where the dog
looks edible,
and the wind blown
dust burns flesh
around the neck.
Here we eat
Sardines,
Sol-Mex Sardines,
with their yellow metal taste.
 
Here we sit
around the table
not able to admit
the delirium from
bean soup disenthrall
and the suffocation
of incendiary gas.
 
The after
taste of sardines
last for days,
beyond lost
relationships,
beyond the etiquette
of good taste,
the beliefs of
proper hygiene,
But mostly we
eat Sol-Mex Sardines,
not to forget that on the
days when the
bean soup pot runs dry
we have eaten.
 

 

Tezozomoc is a Los Angeles Chicano Poet and 2009 Oscar-Nominated Activist whose work has been featured in Rigorous Journal, Mom Egg Review, Los Angeles Poets for Justice, I Can't Breathe: A Social Justice Literary Magazine, and others. Their poetry has also been featured in Gashes!: Poems and Pain from the Halls of Injustice (a collection of poetry published by Floricanto Press) and the 2021 Boundless Anthology.